Bullying As An Epidemic Less Talked About

Bullying is a real problem, countless young teens wake up in the morning and are afraid to go to school. This is an issue that affects millions of people, not just the ones that are getting bullied, their families even those who bully others, with lasting effects going long into adulthood.

One in five U.S. students say that they have been a victim of bullying in school, many are being bullied online as well. Almost 33% of all students who reported that they had been harassed in some way were bullied at least twice or three times a month during the school year. People reported this happening in the hallway or stairwell at their school, inside the classroom, or in the cafeteria, with less of it happening outside the school grounds.

However, according to some latest studies conducted say that the rates of bulling might be on the decline. There has been a real effort in the past decade on raising awareness, and thanks to that and a lot of viral videos popping up of people standing up to their bullies, people are more and more aware of this problem and have stopped treating this issue lightly. The days of brushing this issue off, and of teachers doing nothing to combat this epidemic might soon be over.

Although I think that being bullied might build the character, I would never want anyone to go through with what I did. As various studies show that the adverse effects are pretty real, from a greater risk of mental illness to a negative self-perception to headaches and stomach aches. How can you tell if someone is going to be a subject of bullies? The thing is, you can’t.

No one knows what makes some people targets. You can be a social person liked by a lot of people, funny and personable, or you could be a marginalized and withdrawn person, sometimes none of these things matter. You could even be a bully yourself.  There is no magic formula on how to be, and how to avoid it.  But you know what, it doesn’t have to be this way. There are ways we can minimize this epidemic.